Mark Collop in “Moving Pictures” at brand 10/and X art spaces, Fort Worth

"Dog Fetch" video still

“Dog Fetch” video still

Mark Collop, 2004 studio art alumnus now living and making art in New York City, is one of twelve artists included in Moving Pictures, an exhibition of contemporary film and video which will be presented simultaneously at brand 10 Art Space and their second venue, and X Art Space, both venues in Fort Worth.

The opening at both locations is on September 7th  from 1:00 – 9:00 p.m. and the with the exhibit continuing through October 26th.

Collop’s Dog Fetch video will be presented.  Among the other artists presented are notables Frances Bagley, Hillerbrand + Magsamen, and Wura-Natasha Ogunji.

Zach Nader work profiled in Arts & Science Journal online

Nader - Counterweight

Art & Science Journal, an online blog, has profiled alumnus ZACH NADER and his Counterweight series of photographic works in an essay by Erin Saunders.  Click here to read the essay.

Nader is presenter of The New West Texas Sky Project currently on view in the Folio Gallery of the Texas Tech School of Art through September 22nd.  The exhibition is presented by Landmark Arts, participating organization of the 2013 Texas Biennial.

Zach Nader received an MFA in Studio Art – Photography in 2011.  He currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

In the In-Between Interviews Two SOA Alumni in May

Quite by accident, it would seem, In the In-Between: journal of digital imaging artists, an online blog run by Greg Jones, has interviewed two School of Art alumni this month.

"Mountain (W….f$)," from the series, Bit Rot. © Kalee Appleton

“Mountain (W….f$),” from the series, Bit Rot. © Kalee Appleton

Kalee Appleton, who has a 2005 BFA in photography and is currently working on an MFA at Texas Women’s University in Denton, had an interview about her current work posted on May 15th.  Click to read “Kalee Appleton and the Digital Synthetic.”

 

"Counterweight/03," from the series, Counterweight. © Zach Nader

“Counterweight/03,” from the series, Counterweight. © Zach Nader

Zach Nader, who has a 2011 MFA in photography and is currently living and working as an artist in Brooklyn, had his interview posted yesterday.  Click to read “Zach Nader and the Hacked Vernacular.”

Congratulations to both of them on their continued art practices.

Randall Reid Opens Solo Show at William Campbell Contemporary

Painting alumnus RANDALL REID, of San Marcos, will open a solo show of his recent work at William Campbell Contemporary Art in Fort Worth this Friday, May 10th during an Opening Reception from 6:00-8:00 PM.  The exhibition is titled Resurrected Dreams: Cowboys, Aliens & Espionage.

Largely informed by personal interest in old television series, movies, and 1960s sci-fi, the new pieces explore our collective pop-cultural history Resurrected Dreams is the first body of Reid’s work so tightly focused on specific themes. He has cropped, painted, and otherwise manipulated found graphics to highlight theme and pictorial quality, along with structural elements, color balance, and texture. Of the new work, Reid comments, “I feel I am arranging layers, passages, ambiguous realities, and figurative elements, which can become narrative anthologies.”

This exhibition continues through June 15th. Works in the exhibition can be previewed at William Campbell Contemporary Art.

Reid also has a solo show which opened in Santa Fe last Friday. Randall Reid: Full Circle is currently on view at Nuart Gallery through May 19th.  A review of the exhibition by Tor Travis can be found at the Santa Fe Reporter.

picks-main-measures.widea

Clamp Light Art Studios Alumni Exhibition – May 10th

Clamp Light Studio logo imageCurrent and former Clamp Light Art Studios resident artists, including Texas Tech alumni, Brianna Burnett, Zane Carroll, Wesley Harvey, Erin Hernsberger, Jimena Marin, Sarah T. Roberts, and Kim Rumfelt will present new works in a Studios Alumni Exhibition and special early sale to support studio renovations.

This event will take place May 10th from 5-10 pm at Clamp Light Gallery located at 706 Fredericksburg Road in San Antonio.

KEN LITTLE RECEIVES TEXAS STATE ARTIST HONOR

Ken LittleOn Monday night Ken Little was honored as the 2014 TEXAS STATE VISUAL ARTIST – 3D in a public ceremony sponsored by the Texas Commission on the Arts in Austin.

You can go to the TCA page to read more about Ken and his accomplishments.

Ken, a 1970 alumnus of the studio art program, has been a longtime supporter of School of Art.  In 2007, he teamed up with the Medici Circle School of Art support group to create a new scholarship endowment to benefit Studio Art students.

The Gift of Time

Old trooper, I see your child’s red crayon pass,
bleeding deletions on the galleys you hold
under your throbbing magnifying glass,
that worn arena, where the whirling sand
and broken-hearted lions lick your hand
refined by bile as yellow as a lump of gold.

                                    -Robert Lowell, from “For George Santayana”

 

Day 1

At the suggestion of a local farmer, and after some deliberation, we took a back road and then no road at all, climbing over a cratered field of scrub into RAiR’s backyard. One of the residents came out fuming. “Turn around! Turn around!” He gestured toward a driveway that had been all but invisible beforehand. Rattled, Joe and I swung back—inched back, I should say—to the proper entrance. “A grand first impression,” Joe sighed.

We met Ryder Richards in front of his apartment and studio, a dun-colored affair with a slant silver roof that glared. All the other apartments looked much the same, excepting the compound’s meetinghouse whose single spire, in small silver letters, declared RAiR’s motto: The Gift of Time. Ryder showed us into the guest apartment where we would be staying. “There are towels in the bathroom,” he said. “You guys freshen up, then come over to my place for a drink.”

Joe showered first. We had been shed-camping in Madrid the past three days and were sooty for all the fires we had huddled over; too, the coal that blotched the surrounding hills—which we one day hiked—and hung in the air as dust, residual from the town’s old mines. Everything in Madrid seemed dirty, black. At RAiR it was the opposite: the walls were starkly white, the furniture austere. Even the sky was spotless.

Joel Kiser In First Iron Pour at Collin College

On Saturday April 20th, Collin College Sculpture faculty and students successfully poured cast iron for the first time in the history of the Collin College Art Department under the direction of Sculpture Professor Luke Sides and Art Labs Coordinator Joel Kiser (2007 BFA in Sculpture from Texas Tech).  This epic feat was made possible by a dedicated group of sculpture students who worked together to safely pour over 800 lbs. of cast iron.

Joel Kiser feeding the cupola.

Joel Kiser feeding the cupola.

In the weeks leading up to the iron pour, sculpture students diligently collected scrap bathtubs and assisted in the welding of sand pits, while at the same time working on their own molds to be cast. All of the iron poured was actually collected by hand breaking cast iron bathtubs and sinks into small potato chip size pieces to be collected and poured into a homemade cupola furnace, constructed by Kiser.

JOELCommented Kiser, “I have never seen such excitement and dedication from our sculpture students. Usually, we teach techniques and processes that follow the students into their four-year art-making futures. Today, however, we were able to give them a unique life experience, in terms of teamwork and camaraderie, that they can carry with them for the rest of their lives. For me, that is what teaching is all about.”

Guns and Gods: an Interview with Ryder Richards

Ryder Richards (left) with Nicholas Pierce at Roswell Museum of Art.

Ryder Richards (left) with Nicholas Pierce at Roswell Museum of Art.

Through April 17th, Roswell Museum and Art Center will be showing new works by Ryder Richards in an exhibition titled Conflicted. Ryder, who received his BFA in painting and drawing from Texas Tech in 2001, is currently a fellow at the RAiR program in Roswell, NM. Drawing equal inspiration from his upbringing and his travels through Europe, where he studied classical architecture and Renaissance sculpture, the work that Ryder has thus far produced at RAiR—the work on display in Conflicted—infuses Greek myths with Western ideologies. Guns and gods appear alongside one another.

I met Ryder for the first time over spring break. Inside the starkly white and spacious walls of his RAiR apartment, we talked till long after sundown. Our conversation ranged from McCarthy to collaboration. This week we revisited similar topics over email.

Collusion, 2012 wood, acrylic 72" x 60" x 60"

Collusion, 2012
wood, acrylic
72″ x 60″ x 60″

 

1. You draw with gunpowder; create with a tool that is typically used to destroy. In your mind where do violence and creation meet?

They meet in the act, the action of creation, just as they do in the act of destruction. The important thing is that creation and destruction are transformations, which is an action of violence against the nature of the status quo or the object. For instance, a piece of paper is pure until we decide to create and ruin it by drawing on it: we have just imposed our will onto the paper, defiling it. This is a form of violence no matter how beautiful or well-intentioned the result.

The True and the Beautiful: an Interview with Ted Kincaid

Ted Kincaid

Talley Dunn Galley recently held its first exhibition of new work by Dallas-based artist Ted Kincaid. Called The Terrible Truth/ The Beautiful Lie, the exhibition showcased five bodies of work in which Kincaid explores the veracity of the photographic image. I had the opportunity to interview the artist over email last week. My questions (in italics) and his answers follow.

 

Q: You received your MFA from the University of Kentucky and your BFA from Texas Tech University. Would you mind briefly discussing your experience at each school? With whom did you study, and how did they influence your subsequent pursuits?

A: I was fortunate to study with Rick Dingus, Lynwood Kreneck, Ken Dixon and James Hannah during my time at Tech. Since I was a photography major and printmaking minor, all four of these mentors influenced my direction, drive, work ethic and aesthetic development in different yet complementary ways.

 

Q: I’m interested in your creative process. Would you please divulge how you go about drawing a photograph? Are there source images? And if so, how do you choose them?

A: When I initially began this current body of work, I had just finished the CLOUD series, where I tried to take an actual photographic image as far from its original appearance without adding or taking anything away from it, essentially concocting an incredibly unreal image purely out of factual materials from a photographic image. My work has always concerned questioning the veracity of the photographic image, and that trajectory has eventually led me to pushing a photographic image to its most un-photographic edges.

LA Sky 8061

“LA Sky 8061″
digital photograph on canvas