Alumnus Toby Sudduth Passes Away

Untitled-1TTU alumnus Brian Tobias ‘Toby’ Sudduth doting husband, loving father and son, fiercely talented graphic designer and generous friend – passed away on Thursday, March 2 in Austin, Texas. He was 49. His obituary can be found [HERE].

Toby’s boundless love and ceaseless energy, as well as his wicked sense of humor and infectious, booming laughter, will be greatly missed by his family and many, many, many friends.

Toby was born on July 24, 1967 in Lubbock, Texas, to James and Lynda Sudduth. His family also included his brother Jason, who was born four years after Toby. The four were extremely close, and Toby’s appreciation of family stemmed from growing up in a supportive household with two parents who deeply loved each other and their sons. Toby’s father Jim (director of bands at Texas Tech) and mother Lynda (a public school choir teacher) passed on their passion for music to Toby, who played the clarinet. Toby’s talents as musician earned him multiple all-district, all-region and all-area honors in both junior high and high school. After graduating cum laude from Coronado High School in Lubbock in 1985, he continued to play clarinet in his father’s symphonic band at Texas Tech until he decided to concentrate more on graphic design.

Toby graduated cum laude from Texas Tech with a BA in graphic design and a minor in packaging and jewelry design in 1990.

Toby worked for Primo Angeli and Axion Design in San Francisco before venturing out his own to begin Sudduth Design in 2002. The list of Toby’s clients is long and impressive. His unique logo and package design was sought after by many well-known companies, including Deep Eddy Vodka, Smart Flour, Tiny Pies, Better Bites Bakery, Ghiradelli, Krusteaz, and many, many others. He won multiple awards for graphic design, including the Addy Award for Deep Eddy Vodka and Mobius Award for Chili Chaser Salsa. He was also recognized in a feature article that appeared in Graphic Design USA. He has had multiple logos published in Logo Lounge, and his work has been seen in many magazines including Wired and Texas Monthly.

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